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Minerva Fest Rec and a wee extra :-)

 Well, the minerva_fest  has certainly gotten off to a bang!  The very first story I'll Be There Before You is a winner.  It's a lovely depiction of Minerva's relationship with Amelia Bones, told in flashbacks as Minerva heals from the multiple hexing she got near the end of OotP.  The writing is evocative and atmospheric, starting from Minerva's youth in Portree on the Isle of Skye on the day she met a visiting Amelia at a ceilidh.  The author's facility with characterization makes you understand right away who these people are and where they fit with one another.  The heights around Portree are a character, too, and a very important one.  The very next day after they meet, MInerva takes her up to see the view, and the stone at the top becomes the place they meet every year on midsummer's day, no matter what may befall in the meantime. The twists and turns in their relationship are beautifully portrayed and the powerful ending will leave you with tears in your eyes.  Go read this - you will love it!

As I was reading the story, it brought to mind a poem by Skye Bard Aonghas MacNeacail, who was born and brought up in Portree, and I wonder if the author of I'll Be There Before You has read it.  I won't bore you with the poem in its original Scottish Gaelic - if you don't know the language you won't be able to make heads nor tails of it.  Just trust me when I say that the English Translation, while still lovely, has nothing on the original in beauty.  The translation is the poet's.

The Stone

stroke me, winds, with
news from each quarter: rest on me

stroke me sun, your
your light heats my heart: rest on me

stroke me moon, my
health in your whiteness: rest on me

stroke me elements, your
showers wash me clean: rest on me

peace in me,
slience

Comments

( 4 comments — Leave a comment )
kellychambliss
Oct. 5th, 2010 05:18 am (UTC)
This is lovely; thank you! I wish I could read it in the original. And you're right -- the landscape is as much a character in the story as the people are. So glad you enjoyed it. We wanted to start the fest off right. (That ending kills me every time I read it.)
albalark
Oct. 8th, 2010 06:31 pm (UTC)
'S e do bhetha! ^_^ (That's 'You are welcome' in Scottish Gaelic)

Aonghas MacNeacail is an amazing poet and songwriter. . . he's written some lovely and some searing things. If you ever run across Oideachadh Ceart ( A Proper Schooling in English) it's worth your while to read. The poems are in Gaelic, with the poet's English translation along side. If you have a few minutes to devote to listening, there's an interview on BBC Alba in which the poet reads one of my favorites called Breisleach. Here is the link: http://www.bbc.co.uk/alba/foghlam/larachnambard/poets/aonghas_macneacail/bardachd/index2.shtml#analysis_links_patch . Just underneath, if you click on the Capercaillie link, you can hear the amazing Karen Matheson sing this. She'll take your breath away. The translation is here: http://www.celticlyricscorner.net/capercaillie/breisleach.htm . I'll bet you're sorry now! ::g::

We wanted to start the fest off right.

You definitely did!

Edited at 2010-10-08 06:40 pm (UTC)
dickgloucester
Oct. 5th, 2010 08:23 am (UTC)
That is such an amazingly beautiful poem. Thank you!
albalark
Oct. 8th, 2010 06:39 pm (UTC)
You are very welcome! If you'd like to read more, you could probably find the volumes of his poetry and their English translations pretty easily the next time you are back in the U.K.
( 4 comments — Leave a comment )